Traffic Signal Design: Complete Streets Application

Meets: Tu, W and Th from 8 AM to 5 PM

Registration is not allowed at this time.
Please contact our office for more information.

Support Person: Tech Transfer Registrar  Phone: 510-643-4393  Email: registrar@techtransfer.berkeley.edu

Description

This new course introduces the practical design considerations in traffic signal designs that are above and beyond the basic introductions. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and other national and state references with recommended practices and real-world illustrations, this course will explore the multi-modal design expectations from today's traffic signal designers in a complete-street environment.

This course will introduce complex signal phasing diagrams, typical features of controller firmware, and configuration of signal cabinets; and signal indications/heads placement and detection layout with respect to design applications for rail crossings, emergency vehicles, bus transit, bicycles, pedestrians, and cars. Additionally, this course will introduce the design concept for bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT) and heavy rail.

The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process that starts with preliminary and progress design submittals, as well as formats of design review comments and resolutions expected by typical public agencies. While this course is suitable for traffic signal designers with varying experience, this course will be introduced as a sequential next-level course to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts), or equivalent. The goal is for the course participants to become familiar with real-world, multi-modal, signal-design applications that accommodate various street types and intersections users.

Click here for a detailed outline.

Topics Include

  • signal phasing (review of basics)
  • complex signal phasing
  • controller firmware features and signal cabinet configurations
  • layout of signal heads and detections within Multi-Modal Contexts
  • adaptive traffic control and other "next gen" options
  • sample applications in various modes:
    • pedestrians (hybrid beacons, lead pedestrian intervals and pedestrian scrambles)
    • bicycles (Types I-III/IV bikeways)
    • transit signal priority and bus rapid transits
    • emergency vehicles (fire station and en-route), rail crossings (typical, pre-signal, queue-cutter)
    • light rail transit

    What You Will Learn

    Students gain a good working understanding of concepts and engineering practices needed to develop plans for traffic signal installations within a multi-modal context.

    Who Should Attend

    This is a next-level sequential course targeted for traffic engineers, technicians, and maintenance and construction personnel with adequate traffic signal design experience or prior training equivalent to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts) course.

    Requirements

    Please bring the following tools to the course: pocket calculator, engineer's scale (with 1:20 scale), 12" straight edge, and four colored pencils (red, green, blue, black). Optional item is a template with circles, squares and rectangles. The perspective course participants will be exposed to Caltrans Standard Plans and Specifications, and are encouraged to review them online at http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/esc/oe/construction_standards.html
Hours:16.00
CEUs:1.60

Bill Shao

PE, TE, PTOE, City of Los Angeles

Mr. Bill Shao is a principal transportation engineer with LADOT. Currently heading the Design and Construction Bureau, he was a program manager in signal systems/ITS with two plus decades of experience with the City, both in capital outlays and operational/safety projects that span across highway, transit, rail, ITS, and active transportation modes. Previously an instructor for the Los Angeles METRO, he has served in research panels for TRB-NCHRP and FHWA. A California registered civil engineer and traffic engineer, he holds a M.S. in transportation systems engineering and a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of California, Irvine; and a M.S. in transportation management from San Jose State University.


Josh Peterman

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